Touché – you got me!

Touché – you got me!

Many faculty and students could be seen intently reading the TFP’s statement.

This past Monday, March 26, at Penn State University, the TFP Student Action did a campaign and Campus Rosary Crusade (CRC) in support of the Chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Peter Pace, who took a principled stance on the immorality of homosexual acts. Joining Student Action were members of the Sedes Sapientiae Institute and students of the St. Louis de Montfort Academy.

The following three posters were displayed:
“Rosary Crusade to Restore Christian Culture”
“General Pace: Thank you for your moral courage – Semper Fidelis!”
“Natural Law YES! Unnatural Vice NO!”

The campaign began as usual with prayers to Our Lady. Two thousand copies of the TFP statement recently published in The Washington Times were handed out: Is the Uproar Against General Pace the Beginning of a Religious Persecution?

Students, faculty, staff, and other pedestrians filled out surveys. Many of the reactions were very favorable. Even those who shouted rude comments inadvertently helped the effort, because they demonstrated to the general public that TFP members take a peaceful and moral stand, rather than emotional attacks. Those who favored General Pace clearly noticed this distinction.

Surprisingly, many were not aware of the media onslaught against General Pace.

Surprisingly, many were not aware of the media onslaught against General Pace.

A retired Marine officer passing by gave us his full support and prayers. Also a young student who was signed up with the U.S. Marine Corps was glad to see the TFP praying in public, educating people on important moral issues.1 Interestingly, because we did not make the issue of homosexuals being barred from the military a personal issue, the opposition was forced to ask telling questions such as: “What exactly is natural law anyway?”
The campaign also afforded the opportunity to challenge the revolutionary mindset so prevalent on college campuses. Some students claimed that homosexuality and other immoral behavior does not affect the trustworthiness of public officials or compromise the integrity of military values. TFP volunteer Patrick Danforth challenged this assumption, which stirred a heated response from a foul-mouthed man who screamed continuously: “Don’t you ever say that about homosexuals again!” Intelligent discussion was out of the question, so Patrick pulled out his Rosary and began praying the Hail Mary. In no time, TFP member James Slobodnik said: “That guy is gone now, he just disappeared!” Such is the power of the Most Holy Rosary!

The campaign ended with a public rosary, in honor of the 90th anniversary of the apparitions of Our Lady of Fatima.

The campaign ended with a public rosary, in honor of the 90th anniversary of the apparitions of Our Lady of Fatima.

Other opponents simply tried to deny General Pace’s right to take a moral stand as Chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff. During one of the many discussions, John Ritchie, director of TFP Student Action, challenged a student who believed morality should be divorced from the public square. When Mr. Ritchie challenged his position using philosophy and natural law principles, after twenty minutes, he admitted defeat, saying: “Touché – you got me!”

The indiscriminate use of the word homosexual and its synonyms has generated much confusion in the public. Many times, it is unclear if it refers to someone with same-sex attraction only or if it refers to someone who practices homosexual acts. This confusion favors the homosexual agenda. We cannot equate people with same-sex attraction who resist it and are chaste with those who engage in homosexual behavior. These are two distinct and essentially different moral realities. Thus, we use homosexual to refer only to those who practice homosexual acts and thereby deserve moral reprobation.

Footnotes

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