Rosary Crusade in New Hampshire Takes “Live Free or Die” Attitude Against Socialism

On the morning of July 16, a group of Catholics rallied on the sidewalk in front of New Hampshire’s State House in Concord to pray for America’s conversion. The American Society for the Defense of Tradition, Family, and Property (TFP) organized this Rosary rally as part of its nationwide “Mary, Mother of Mercy, Restore America” campaign. Led by TFP volunteers, its mission is to obtain for America the graces of calm, courage, and confidence by praying the Rosary at all fifty state capitals.

Rosary Crusade in New Hampshire Takes “Live Free or Die” Attitude Against Socialism

Upon the group’s arrival, an elderly couple asked what the event was about. A TFP volunteer explained the rally’s purpose. They thanked him warmly, saying “That’s great! God bless.” Such responses are everywhere since people sense that America desperately needs prayers.

Rosary Crusade in New Hampshire Takes “Live Free or Die” Attitude Against SocialismLocal prayer warriors joined the rally, and there were even friends who came from Maine to attend. TFP members passed out signs to those who began arriving.  Clearly visible to the public eye were messages like: “Honk Against Socialism” and “God Bless America.” One man saw the latter sign and exclaimed, “I would love to stand behind that!” He did.

“This is the best thing that ever happened to Concord,” exclaimed one local, who was overjoyed to practice his Catholic faith publicly, especially after the coronavirus shutdown of churches. Behind him, a lady who makes rosaries was walking to and fro, eager to give them to anyone who needed them.

Rosary Rallies for America

As the rosary rally progressed, the prayer warriors responded energetically, “Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners…”  TFP member Matthew Miller noticed a peculiar figure across the street who stood by his bicycle, motionless but pensive. He conversed with the man who loosely described himself as “Christian” without going into detail. However, he was mesmerized by the display of Catholic devotion, especially the statue of Our Lady. Walking across the street, he knelt before the Blessed Mother for a long time, accepted a rosary and placed it around his neck.  On rising, he bowed and stayed nearby. “Thanks for coming!” he said. “I really needed this.”

The statue that moved him is a miraculous statue that cried tears in New Orleans in 1972, months before Roe v. Wade. The International Pilgrim Virgin Statue of Our Lady of Fatima has traveled the world and touched many hearts. Her presence at the rally touched the rally participants and brought a blanket of calm over the area.

The rosary rally was later followed by a “honk campaign” at an intersection nearby. This classic TFP method consists of teams of volunteers holding signs that read “Honk Against Socialism” and other similar messages.

Many people would assume that those in a state capital in New England would not react very favorably to a campaign against socialism. However, the response was stunning. The honks from one direction collided those of the other direction of traffic. Quite a few in the passenger seats were seen leaning over to the driver’s side and honking the horn.

A lady stopped her car to ask about the rally. Her husband in the passenger seat looked to her for the sign language translation. She began to tell him about the campaign but was slowed down by the communication barrier. However, the man took a closer look at the signs. Looking at his wife, he leaned over and honked the horn.

A gang of bicycling teenagers came by and circled the rally. “You can take these [wheelies] for honks,” one of them yelled as he passed by.

This rally may well have been one of the “best things that ever happened to Concord.” America has never been in such a situation. In a state with the motto, “Live Free or Die,” these rallies against socialism drove the message home that Americans cannot roll over and die, but rather fight the good fight.  May Our Lady grant Americans the grace to be calm, courageous, and confident in the current storm.

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