Why Catholics Cannot be Silent about Scorsese’s ‘Silence’

Why Catholics Cannot be Silent about Scorsese’s ‘Silence’In the history of the Church, many martyrs died for the Faith. Starting with Saint Stephen the Protomartyr shortly after the Resurrection, they were the first to be remembered, venerated for their public witness and raised to the altars with the title of saint. There are also those who denied the Faith under pressure. They are forgotten and buried in the dark recesses of history.

The modern world has a problem with martyrs. People cannot understand the glory of their witness for Christ. Modern man would rather try to find some justification behind the anguished decision of those who deny the Faith.

Such is the case of Martin Scorsese’s latest film “Silence.” It is a tale about this second category of non-martyrsof whom Our Lord said: “But he that shall deny me before men, I will also deny him before my Father who is in heaven” (Matt. 10:33).

Prophecies of Our Lady of Good Success About Our Times

Curiously, early reviews of “Silence,” have been negative—even by liberal media hostile to the Church. The consensus is that Scorsese’s attempt to propose for general admiration one who outwardly denied the Faith has fallen flat.

Perhaps it is because human nature finds such denials distasteful. Even the director’s talents, Hollywood special effects and media publicity cannot overcome it. Scorsese’s tortuous attempt to justify his tormented protagonist proves tedious and unconvincing.

Hollywood’s Teaching Authority

“Silence” is based on a 1966 novel of the same name by the Japanese author Shusaku Endo. The plot revolves around the fictional character of a Portuguese Jesuit priest in seventeenth century Japan at the time of a violent anti-Catholic persecution. The film represents a “struggle of faith” in which the priest must choose between the lives of his flock and his Faith. In the face of his trials, he finds God is silent to his entreaties, hence the film’s title. Finally, Christ Himself supposedly breaks the silence by interiorly telling the priest that he might outwardly deny the Faith by trampling upon His image to save his flock.
Such a shallow story so contrary to all Church teaching would usually pose no threat to Catholics who are firm in their Faith. However, Hollywood has tragically assumed the role of a teaching authority to countless American Catholics. Thus, the principal lesson taught by the film—that outwardly denying the Faith can sometimes be justified and even desired by God—does pose a danger to the many uncatechized that might mistake Hollywood script for Scriptures. Any silence about “Silence” might be misconstrued as consent.

It is not the case to review the film or explore its convoluted plot and subplots. Such films are nothing new; they are simply means to reinforce certain false premises that undermine the Faith. It is far better to address the false premises themselves and, especially as it applies to modernity’s woeful misunderstanding of martyrdom.

Martyrdom Is Not Defeat

The first false premise is the modern assumption that life is the supreme value. This is a terrible premise since if there are no values worth dying for then there is no real reason worth living for. In a materialistic world that adores life and its enjoyment, martyrdom represents failure. Those who renounce the Faith and martyrdom are winners. Those who don’t are losers.

The message of fictional accounts like “Silence,” is that life is to be worshipped to such extent that even God must be made complicit in inspiring the apostasy that saves the lives of the faithful. However, such accounts are indeed fiction; they ignore the historical reality of what happened.

A Denial of the Historical Record

The historic record of the Japanese martyrs is one of the most glorious in Church history. It is a burning rebuke of modernity’s idolization of life. Tens of thousands suffered or died at the hands of cruel executioners. If tales are needed to inspire authors, let writers tell of the courage, heroism and constancy of these Japanese martyrs, young and old, male and female, religious and secular, who joyfully gave their lives for Christ and earned for themselves the crown of eternal glory. If villains need be found for their stories, let them find them in the cruel governors and judges who condemned the Christians to death.

Saint Alphonsus de Liguori

Saint Alphonsus de Liguori

In 1776, Saint Alphonsus de Liguori wrote the book, The Victories of the Martyrs, which has one large section that tells incredible stories of the Japanese martyrs. He speaks of a Japanese Christian named Ursula, for example, who upon seeing her husband and two young children martyred, cried out: “Be Thou praised, O My God! For having rendered me worthy to be present at this sacrifice, now grant me the grace to have a share in their crown!” She and her youngest daughter were then beheaded.

Indeed, any priest who would renounce his Faith to save the lives of his flock would be reviled by the Japanese faithful for both his denial and depriving the flock of the crown of martyrdom.

If there is any silence in Scorcese’s “Silence,” it is that silence which ignores the dauntless courage and supernatural joy found in the Japanese martyrs and missionaries whose witness was so superior that their enemies were defeated by their arguments and resorted to killing them. Their martyrdom was their victory, not their defeat.

Acts Have Meaning

A second premise is that outward acts have no meaning, or can  mean whatever the person determines them to be. Such a premise is typical of postmodern thought that would “deconstruct” acts from their natural meaning and context.

Thus, any benefit or inspiration can justify an act that signifies the denial of the Faith, since acts have no fixed meaning. Indeed, the theme of the film shrouds the outward denial with the good intentions of the protagonist’s concern for the safety of his flock.

Again, this shows a profound misunderstanding of the idea of martyrdom. The word martyr itself means witness—an external manifestation of Faith to others. The postmodern interpretation of the martyr’s dilemma questions the notion that there can be witnesses that are so firmly convinced of the truths of the Catholic religion that they gladly suffer death rather than deny it. The “meta-narrative” of the great deeds of the martyrs is no longer valued. Even the idea of truth is relative. All must be reduced to the level of personal experience.

Again, such an interpretation runs contrary to the historical reality that was centered on the notion of objective truth. Those who persecute the Church hate this truth and the moral law taught by Christ and His Church. They especially hate the public witness given by Christians because this witness denounces them for their sins and wickedness. All they asked of their victims was an outward sign of denial. For this reason, persecutors often preferred to force Christians to deny the Faith than to take their lives.

Historically, that is why those who persecute the Church are always willing to offer honors, offices and benefits to those who renounce the Faith. They will always give Christians an excuse to stop being witnesses. This includes those “good intentions” to diminish the sufferings of family, relatives and fellow Christians. However, this is only a pretext. Indeed, what they want to destroy is the witness that haunts them and calls them to virtue. They want renegade Christians to make their denial public to discourage the witness of others.

Thankfully, their efforts are often frustrated by the constancy of faithful Christians that moves others to conversion. They do not understand Tertullian’s encomium that “the blood of martyrs is the seed of the Church,” (Apologeticus, Ch. 50).

The God of Silence

The final false premise comes from a naturalistic understanding of the world in which people do not grasp how God works in souls. The secular world assumes God’s natural position is one of silence. When secular writers are forced to imagine the action of God upon their characters, they portray it as a purely personal matter based on feelings and emotions inconsistent and outside the logic of divine law.

This is perhaps the greatest misunderstanding of the Faith. Modern authors create their own god of silence and believers outside of the life of grace.

Such a combination leads to absurd characterizations like that of “Silence.” Martyrdom cannot be based on emotion or feeling since it involves surrendering man’s greatest natural gift—life. This is something so difficult that it is beyond human strength to achieve. Martyrdom must entail grace, which enlightens the intellect and strengthens the will to allow Christians to do that which is beyond human nature. God’s grace would never allow a person to deny Christ before men.

Why Catholics Cannot be Silent about Scorsese’s film ‘Silence’ - The Christian Martyrs of Nagasaki, Japan

God’s grace would never allow a person to deny Christ before men. Indeed the merits of the martyrs lie in being the effects of God’s grace and their cooperation with grace.
Christian Martyrs of Nagasaki. 16th-17th century Japanese painting. Artist unknown.

Martyrdom—The Fruit of Grace

That is why Saint Alphonsus states that it is a matter of Faith that, “Martyrs are indebted for their crown to the power of the grace which they received from Jesus Christ; for he it is that gave them the strength to despise all the promises and all the threats of tyrants and to endure all the torments till they had made an entire sacrifice of their lives.”

Saint Augustine further states that the merits of the martyrs lie in being the effects of God’s grace and their cooperation with grace.

In other words, God cannot be silent in the face of martyrdom as Scorcese’s “Silence” film affirms. His justice will not allow a person to be tempted beyond their capacity to resist. He is intimately involved in those facing martyrdom. He gives them grace—a created participation in divine life itself. Facing martyrdom without grace is impossible. While God may allow for trials, He is never silent.

Catholics Cannot Remain Silent

And that is why faithful Catholics cannot remain silent in the face of Scorcese’s “Silence.” Scorcese’s film is a tragic denial of God’s grace in a world in dire need of it. In these days when Catholics are being martyred, Catholics need to know that God is never silent. They will never be put in a situation where God betrays Himself. He will always be there when needed.

The secular worldview is so narrow-minded and asphyxiating, but alas so prevalent. Today’s obsession with self permeates the culture to the exclusion of God. It is little wonder that so many would think there is “silence” on the other side of martyrdom. It is largely because they find emptiness in their own lives. They cannot imagine the action of God and His grace.

Amid the frenetic intemperance of the times, the agitated crowds ironically do not seek out God where He is always found—in the silence of their own souls.

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  • Sunisyde

    98% of the movies that come out of Hollywierd are trash. The last movie I saw in the theater was the Passion. Otherwise, I buy my movies from a Catholic bookstore.

  • Pawel66

    Thank you for this important text. Scorsese forgot that death is not the end.

  • PMcC33

    Scorcese’s film is a tragic denial of God’s grace in a world in dire need of it.

  • 441019

    In the biography of the Virgin Mary by Mary of Agreda, St. Stephen, the 1st martyr, could hardly wait to be martyred. He asked Mary how long he would have to wait before he would be allowed to give his life for Christ.

  • jason maxwell

    I only just watched the film last night.
    This article is very well written and managed to encapsulate my prayerful thoughts in regard to the film; reinforcing the inward witness of the Holy Spirit.
    bergoglio celebrated this film and bestowed honors upon the notoriously blasphemous scorcese. bergoglio is a demon.
    Christians need to vigorously invoke an excorcism of the ‘vatican’.
    Donald Trump is a resurrection of the American Spirit. and the global cabal is convulsing as a demoniac.
    May the Good God pour out His Holy Water upon the ‘vatican’ as He did it in Noahs day.

  • Pater Stavros

    Always puzzling how the gifts of God are twisted and used against Him. Scorsese was taught by Jesuits, this may explain his torment and confusion.

    • salesgirl

      Correction, he was taught by apostate Jesuits. Sadly, we no longer have Jesuits like St Isaac Jogues and the North American martyrs, who suffered deaths as gruesome as the Japanese martyrs because they responded to Christ’s thrist to save souls.

  • Kevin Kelleher

    I agree that the film is, sadly, a disappointment. But do not forget, that one of the priests does in fact, die bravely for the Church.

    • salesgirl

      But the film didnt focus on him, sadly

    • Catherine Langston

      I’m glad it was Driver. Guy is an embodiment of an El Greco-Roman painting. Quite stunning

  • disqus_AJGcWpqdcZ

    You should do some fact checking. Fr. Ferreira was an apostate priest (Jesuit head of Japan at the time of his apostasy) who lived out his life after his apostasy under a Japanese name, with a Japanese family, and at times as a translator for the Japanese authorities at trials of priests. That some individuals, under torture, denied their faith is a historical fact just as much as those who died for the faith. “Let he among you who is without sin cast the first stone.” Truth exists! To me the movie did show the fictional main character as a broken, sad, repressed, and regretful individual after his apostasy and until his death. Of course the insertion of God’s voice approving of the apostasy is wrong on many levels.

    • salesgirl

      The mere suggestion that God would approve, instead of teaching the **truth*** that the Devil can take on forms to deceive us, is enough to reject any piece of mass media. As Mr Horvath points out, the average Joe in this country never learns anything about the Catholic faith but the false propaganda that ignorant Hollyweird movies disseminate. If Hollyweird ever bothered to tell the truth about Christ, they’d show his saints testing the vision of Christ shown in the movie. I know of at least one saint who was tempted by a vision of Jesus telling him to do something the the Bible and Catechism show to be wrong, but when the vision was asked to join in God’s praises it revealed the truth about itself

  • Aint So

    For those who choose to become sustained in genuine communion with God, even a moment of vacuous silence between them and God is impossible. Such a communion sustains the faithful, not only in life, but seamlessly into eternity. For those so engaged, each moment can be observed to be filled with His presence in a manner which binds He and them, utterly and irrevocably, no matter how subtle the immediate awareness of that bond may be. Genuine communion is borne out of a disposition of consummate and vulnerable destitution of the mind and the spirit abandoned selflessly to God. Failing the taking upon ones’ self this disposition, no substantive communion with God is possible, and failing this communion, genuine obedience to God and generosity toward Him are impossible as well.

  • Mark

    Yet another fool who doesn’t know how to read a work of literature and thinks everything dealing with religion is a catechism. Do you seriously believe that if something happens in a novel, that means the author is endorsing it? Really rich for someone who thinks like that to accuse any author of being shallow.

    And the greatest irony of all is that the novel indicts this sort of presumptuous garbage that teaches that because you know the truth, you’ll magically act on it, as if grace operated according to the teachings of Pelagius.

    And it’s transparently obvious that you never read the book and have not even attempted to understand what the story was actually about. You just got triggered like some college snowflake who thinks an author portraying something in a book is equivalent to an endorsement. You’re right up there with kids having conniption fits over Mark Twain because “he says the n-word!!!” as if the purpose of Huckleberry Finn were to bring back slavery.

    • Pawel66

      I understand that that Horvat writes about Scorsese’s movie, not the Endo’s book.
      I will try to find the book

    • salesgirl

      Oh stop. This is a review of the *movie* that everyone’s watching and hearing about, not a review of a book that no one’s heard of for 50 plus years. Who’s the real snowflake, posting this same misdirected rant on every web site with a negative review of the *movie.*

  • salesgirl

    So who will join me in praying on reparation in front of theatres where this plays? St. Ignatius Loyola, founder of Jesuits, always quoted Christ: “what profiteth a man to gain the world and lose his soul?” St. Paul Miki and the 26 Martyrs of Nagasaki, pray for us!

  • Nancy

    We need a Global Catholic Military to defeat these wicked well financed enemies of our Creator. Then Our Father’s commandments could be recognized and enforced by all civil governments and Christ would reign.

    Viva Christo Rey!

    • Pawel66

      I share the sentiment. Still, in contrast to Islam, Christianity thrived in oppression and martyrdom and not conquest.
      I do do not understand this, but it is faith, hope and sacrifice, rather than might that feeds the Church.

  • Guy Garofano

    I have to disagree. The film did not glorify the priests who renounced their faith. And the movie clearly showed the Japanese Christians who maintained their faith in spite of terrible danger. As far as the name of the movie – it was meant to signify the “silence” that the priests sometimes felt was God’s response (or lack thereof) to their prayers. Many of the greatest saints (most recently Mother Theresa) expressed those same feelings, Perhaps the author has never experienced such dark, doubtful moments – but most of us have.

  • salesgirl

    EXACTLY! ! ! >> “Such a shallow story so contrary to all Church teaching would usually pose no threat to Catholics who are firm in their Faith. However, Hollywood has tragically assumed the role of a teaching authority to countless American Catholics. Thus, the principal lesson taught by the film—that outwardly denying the Faith can sometimes be justified and even desired by God—does pose a danger to the many uncatechized that might mistake Hollywood script for Scriptures. Any silence about “Silence” might be misconstrued as consent.”

  • Joe Nash

    For unbelievers the greatest tragedy in life is death. It is the irrefutable disproof of Christianity. For those who believe in Christ the greatest tragedy in life is loss of faith since it also entails the loss of an eternal life in Heaven.

  • disqus_W8X6VR1yyA

    I think a lot of people have a problem with the film more because of who the Director is than the reality the film presents. I thought it did a very good job of bringing home the truth that remaining faithful is not as “pie in the sky” easy as some want to believe it is. We can all sit and want to believe we would not renounce Christ, but if we were standing watching our wives and daughters being raped and our infants having their fingers cut off, and all we had to do was step on a cross, COULD we hold out? No one is claiming the guy is a saint, but I think people are focusing on the wrong thing because it is such a hard truth, that apostasy’s like this under torture, or the torture of others DO happen, and what is the truth in ourselves regarding such trials? I think if people spent a little more time reflecting on that instead of being those to “throw the first stone” at the director, they would benefit from the time spent seeing the film.

    • CHARLIEOD

      what is the truth in ourselves regarding such trials?
      Amen.
      I often think of John McCain (sp?) who says torture does not work. I think it is because he had the stamina to resist, which maybe very few people have.

  • Nuntiandi

    Even in silence, God speaks to us. John’s disagreement with the film considered, we can also argue that those who chose life over martyrdom and suffered the consequences (they continued to be faithful to Christ underground), cannot be considered ‘silent’ in the face of God. God is so all-inclusive that no outward sign can define the truth to one’s faith. Even St Peter who denied Jesus when he opted to save his skin was forgiven and went on to lead the first episode of Christendom. I for one, cannot condemn the those who outwardly apostized over those who today pretend to be show outward sign but inwardly decapitate Christ daily with the hardness of their hearts.

  • Faith of Our Fathers

    Best thing is not to pay to watch this Rubbish. I certainly had no intention of watching when I seen that The Turncoat Neeson ( I used to be a Catholic but am now drawn to Islam ) was trying to act in it . It’s the only way collectively that us paupers can hurt their pockets don’t go and watch their Lies. It’s a great and easy thing now to put the boot into Catholicism. Although M.Scorcese and L . Neeson are now multi Millionaires the Vatican should be the ones to come out and publicly tell Catholics not to go and watch their so called work. Or is that one of their ploys to get free Publicity from the Vatican.

  • Jon Landsbergis

    You have removed my critical comment 4 times, It was sharp retort but no abusive language , insults or links. Why was it removed?

  • Jon Landsbergis

    You have removed my critical comment 4 times, It was sharp retort but no abusive language , insults or links. Why was it removed?

  • corvus corax

    Would you mind explaining how Peters denial of Jesus 3 times fits in with with your analysis of the witness of the martyrs in and Jesus’ statement in the Gospel:

    But whosoever shall deny me before men, him will I also deny before my Father which is in heaven

    • 441019

      St. Peter denied Jesus 3 times because he was afraid, but he was forgiven because he deeply and sincerely repented. Even Judas would have been forgiven if he had repented.

  • KImMcCoy

    This is a needed corrective to our day’s, our culture’s, moral relativism and sheep-like herding behavior which follows cultural meanders rather than the solidity of objective morality, of the validity of Jesus’ statement, “My word is truth.”

  • Jon Landsbergis

    Great, from your article “those who joyfully gave their lives for Christ and earned for themselves the crown of eternal glory. ” unlike the rest of us if our religions are not Christian.What about the church who murdered many for heresy for disobeying the minutiae of doctrine. How about the Teutonic knights who slaughtered pagan Lithuanians for a century and a half, is the pope burning in hell for blessing that genocide,then. what about the slaughter of women who worshipped the goddess religion and the church that committed genocide against them.Look, ,one can criticize the overt anti religious attitude in modern society , though not Christian I have spent many years of my life from childhood simmers to working and vacation at the Lithuanian Franciscan Monastery in Kennebunkport ME and that Francisanism is part of the very fiber of my body but Sorcese is far from that, look at Kundum and others he has done. This article is just a hyper partisan rant not deserving attention since they think they are the only ones to be saved. That is far worse than anything in the movie and a lot more dangerous,

  • bettybluelou

    Thank you for this inspiring article. When I think of all the Christians being martyred around the world right now, this disgusting film is particularly repugnant.

  • Renard N. Bansale

    In my opinion, Christians ought to read and understand the novel, then watch the film and examine Scorsese’s approach in adapting the novel, before judging. I observe that those who have not done so show immense naivete, despite knowing how a Catholic should confront the pressures of apostasy and the glory of martyrdom for the faith.

  • Renard N. Bansale

    Have you guys read Shusaku Endo’s novel?

  • Jon Landsbergis

    Great, from your article “those who joyfully gave their lives for Christ and earned for themselves the crown of eternal glory. ” unlike the rest of us if our religions are not Christian.What about the church who murdered many for heresy for disobeying the minutiae of doctrine. How about the Teutonic knights who slaughtered pagan Lithuanians for a century and a half, is the pope burning in hell for blessing that genocide,then. what about the slaughter of women who worshipped the goddess religion and the church that committed genocide against them.Look, ,one can criticize the overt anti religious attitude in modern society , though not Christian I have spent many years of my life from childhood simmers to working and vacation at the Lithuanian Franciscan Monastery in Kennebunkport ME and that Francisanism is part of the very fiber of my body but Sorcese is far from that, look at Kundum and others he has done. This article is just a hyper partisan rant not deserving attention since they think they are the only ones to be saved. That is far worse than anything in the movie and a lot more dangerous,

  • Jon Landsbergis

    Great, you say”those who joyfully gave their lives for Christ and earned for themselves the crown of eternal glory. ” unlike the rest of us if our religions are not Christian. This is just dogmatic doctrine, it is why the church murdered those for heresy of they disputed doctrine when there were theocracies How about the Teutonic knights who slaughtered pagan Lithuanians for a century and a half, is the pope burning in hell for blessing that genocide,then. what about the slaughter of women who worshipped the goddess religion and the church that committed genocide against them.Look, ,one can criticize the overt anti religious attitude though Sorcese is far from that, look at Kundum and others he has done. This article is just a hyper partisan rant not deserving attention since they think they are the only ones to be saved. That is far worse than anything in the movie and a lot more dangerous,

  • Renard N. Bansale

    Have you guys read Shusaku Endo’s original novel?

  • Leslie Alexander

    Beautiful. Thank you.

  • Jon Landsbergis

    Great, “those who joyfully gave their lives for Christ and earned for themselves the crown of eternal glory. ” unlike the rest of us if our religions are not Christian.. How about the Teutonic knights who slaughtered pagan Lithuanians for a century and a half with the blessing of the pope, is the pope burning in hell then. what about the slaughter of women who worshipped the goddess religion and the church that committed genocide against them.Look, ,one can criticize the overt anti religious attitude though Sorcese is far from that, look at Kundum and others he has done. This article is just a hyper partisan rant not deserving attention since they think they are the only ones to be saved. That is far worse than anything in the movie and a lot more dangerous

  • Mary-Anne Delaney

    Has a petition been started or who do we reach out to so we can object to the movie being shown.

  • Rhiannon122

    I have always admired the martyrs and pray that God will help me if ever I am in that situation. The young Iraqi Christian martyrs are classic examples as are their older relatives who refused to convert and deny Jesus.

    • 441019

      I am hoping that I would have the courage to die for my beliefs; I believe that if I were in that situation, God would give me the grace to do it–however, I would need to pray for that grace.

      • Rhiannon122

        I agree with you.

  • elcer

    John, thank you for this article. For some reason, I have been contemplating the concept of martyrdom lately and wondered if I would have the grace to be able to accept it or would I cave. Having a threat to a family member, especially a child would definitely be a stumbling block for me. This gives me more food for thought.

  • Stewart Davies

    One of the most memorable screen depictions of martyrdom is presented to us in “A Man For All Seasons.” Robert Bolt had the willingness and the wisdom to believe the historical narrative of the execution of St. Thomas More, who refused to support his monarch, King Henry VIII in his quest to obtain a divorce from his first wife. Thomas More went to his death proclaiming; “I die the king’s good servant, and God’s first.” He understood that a denial of his conscience would not be service to his king, but a grave disservice and a betrayal. Atheist and communist Robert Bolt was fascinated by a man who would defend the truth even at the cost of his life.

  • John Launder

    You are right John. A very pertinent piece of writing. Modern man cannot see anything else than his own desire for material well being and pleasure – his self centredness is quite rapidly bringing western civilisation into yet another crisis potentially even worst than those that have gone before because man has turned away from God.

  • Guy Garofano

    I have to disagree with this. The priests who renounce their faith in the movie are not held up as heroes or anything like that. Throughout the movie the enduring faith of the Japanese Christians is clearly portrayed. As far as “silence” some of the greatest saints (like Mother Theresa most recently) felt such silence coming from God. Perhaps the author’s faith has never faltered in all his life – very few of us can say that.

  • Proud mother and friend

    I am grateful for this article as it gave me insight as to how I myself would face martyrdom—To know that God’s grace would be with me is so encouraging!!!

  • Georgie

    Secular society (and some nominal Christians and their churches) are always trying to find the easier softer way, in accordance with human concupiscence. Looks like this movie is just one more attempt to justify denying the fact the path is narrow…and God is with us all the way.

  • Joe Toy

    Now, where is the petition to sign against against this movie and Martin Scorsese with his room temperature IQ and his ilk who produced this utter piece of trash?

  • Faustina11

    I thank God for you, John. These words have brought me to tears of gratitude. Gratitude for the faith that God has given to you, to me and, most especially, to our blessed martyrs.

  • samnigromd

    “SILENCE” is a HATE CRIME—they would not do it if it were about homosexuals. In fact, I bet the gay cult is heavily behind it. Lawsuits are needed. Of course the law does not care about truth or justice, but an effort should be made.

  • Jean Cloutier

    Scorcese Should have remained SILENT!

  • Alphonso: Pre-Vatican 2 Rigid

    J.M.J.

    Words to ponder from Mr. John Horvat II regarding martyrdom:

    “In 1776, Saint Alphonsus de Liguori wrote the book, The Victories of the Martyrs, which has one large section that tells incredible stories of the Japanese martyrs. He speaks of a Japanese Christian named Ursula, for example, who upon seeing her husband and two young children martyred, cried out: ‘Be Thou praised, O My God! For having rendered me worthy to be present at this sacrifice, now grant me the grace to have a share in their crown!’ She and her youngest daughter were then beheaded.

    “Indeed, any priest who would renounce his Faith to save the lives of his flock would be reviled by the Japanese faithful for both his denial and depriving the flock of the crown of martyrdom.

    “If there is any silence in Scorcese’s ‘Silence,’ it is that silence which ignores the dauntless courage and supernatural joy found in the Japanese martyrs and missionaries whose witness was so superior that their enemies were defeated by their arguments and resorted to killing them. Their martyrdom was their victory, not their defeat.”

  • Randal Agostini

    An important article that displays the relentless pursuit of disinformation. Critics of Christianity do not seem to realize that they immediately betray their ignorance when they assume to understand God. For years Hollywood has been an anti Christian machine, exploring cynical ways to introduce doubt. Thank God I seldom rise to the bait.

  • Patricia

    Time and again Martin Scorsese and most, if not all, of Hollywood, prove that they are the adherents of the Whore of Babylon. St. Peter warns us that we must “Be of sober spirit, be on the alert. Your adversary, the devil, prowls around like a roaring lion, seeking someone to devour.” The “roaring lion,” Scorsese has, prostrated himself to Satan. We must be of “sober spirit,” and “on the alert,” regardless of the cost.

  • John W

    Thank you for posting this. It has edified my faith.
    God bless,
    John W

  • Silpa Paul

    Thanks so much for this review. I had not watched the movie but was looking forward to it. Such a disappointment that its is also based on secular propaganda to paint a false image of God.